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Can This Run Warframe

LethalAffliction 182

LethalAffliction

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So, my craptop crapped out on me. Went to BestBuy and bought a $349 desktop that has a 2.2GHz Quad Core with integrated R7 radeon graphics gets 80 FPS in liset but in-game it drops to 8 FPS especially in Law of Retribution Raids so it didn’t have a good dollar to performance ratio. So I decided to return it and build one but it MUST have a pretty hard limit to $500 so here’s what I’ve come up with:

CPU: AMD Athlon X4 880K 4.0GHz Quad-Core ($83.98)
*MoBo: ASRock FM2A88X PRO3+ ATX FM2+ ($64.99)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 ($36.99)
Storage: SanDisk SSD PLUS 2.5″ 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive ($43.99)
**GPU Option 1: Red Dragon Radeon Rx 460 DirectX 12 with 4GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($129.99)
**GPU Option 2: Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti with 2GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($139.99)
Case: Rosewill Challenger ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99)
PSU: EVGA 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($43.49)
TOTAL: With taxes, roughly $500

*If possible I would go ASRock Fatal1ty Gaming FM2A88X+ Killer.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a 430W power supply, sacrifice for a cheaper case with no fans included, and sacrifice for a cheap HDD but I don’t think it’s worth it.

**If possible I would go Radeon Rx 470 with 4GB 256-Bit GDDR5. or . Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 with 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a micro ATX motherboard, sacrifice for a 430W power supply, and sacrifice for a cheap micro ATX case but it may or may not be worth it.

Can someone help me? Will this run Warframe decently? I’m not looking to run with max settings on 1080p but I would like to get 30-40 FPS in-game even if it means running with lowest bare-bone graphics so that I can have an enjoyable experience. Ever since U18.5 hit I can’t seem to get out of 8-15 FPS averages while in-game and I’m hoping $500 can get me to run minimum settings efficiently. I honestly can’t fathom spending more money than that on a PC gaming rig.

Any help or constructive criticism is appreciated.

EDIT: This is my first attempt, and I knew nothing about this stuff 2 days ago. It was a huge learning curve so even compatibility feedback is appreciated. It’s also important that I know nothing about overclocking and what not. Friend was going to help me out with that if I got the better motherboard.

LethalAffliction 182

LethalAffliction

  • Novice
  • Hunter
  • 182
  • 99 сообщений
    • Share

So, my craptop crapped out on me. Went to BestBuy and bought a $349 desktop that has a 2.2GHz Quad Core with integrated R7 radeon graphics gets 80 FPS in liset but in-game it drops to 8 FPS especially in Law of Retribution Raids so it didn’t have a good dollar to performance ratio. So I decided to return it and build one but it MUST have a pretty hard limit to $500 so here’s what I’ve come up with:

CPU: AMD Athlon X4 880K 4.0GHz Quad-Core ($83.98)
*MoBo: ASRock FM2A88X PRO3+ ATX FM2+ ($64.99)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 ($36.99)
Storage: SanDisk SSD PLUS 2.5″ 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive ($43.99)
**GPU Option 1: Red Dragon Radeon Rx 460 DirectX 12 with 4GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($129.99)
**GPU Option 2: Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti with 2GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($139.99)
Case: Rosewill Challenger ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99)
PSU: EVGA 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($43.49)
TOTAL: With taxes, roughly $500

*If possible I would go ASRock Fatal1ty Gaming FM2A88X+ Killer.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a 430W power supply, sacrifice for a cheaper case with no fans included, and sacrifice for a cheap HDD but I don’t think it’s worth it.

**If possible I would go Radeon Rx 470 with 4GB 256-Bit GDDR5. or . Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 with 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a micro ATX motherboard, sacrifice for a 430W power supply, and sacrifice for a cheap micro ATX case but it may or may not be worth it.

Can someone help me? Will this run Warframe decently? I’m not looking to run with max settings on 1080p but I would like to get 30-40 FPS in-game even if it means running with lowest bare-bone graphics so that I can have an enjoyable experience. Ever since U18.5 hit I can’t seem to get out of 8-15 FPS averages while in-game and I’m hoping $500 can get me to run minimum settings efficiently. I honestly can’t fathom spending more money than that on a PC gaming rig.

Any help or constructive criticism is appreciated.

EDIT: This is my first attempt, and I knew nothing about this stuff 2 days ago. It was a huge learning curve so even compatibility feedback is appreciated. It’s also important that I know nothing about overclocking and what not. Friend was going to help me out with that if I got the better motherboard.

Zen’s Microarchitecture — The Unraveling Mystery

In the past couple of months alone we’ve seen a lot of new information come out about Zen. We reported on the AIDA64 changelog which icnluded Zen based “Summit Ridge” and “Raven Ridge” FX CPUs and APUs respectively. Prior to that we had very intriguing revelations about AMD’s Zen and K12 CPU cores taping out. We’ve also managed to learn a lot of about Zen through an official AMD Linux patch that detailed many aspects of the core’s design. If you want to read about everything that we learned with regards to the microarchitecture of the Zen CPU core and what it’s capable of you’ll definitely want to check out our in-depth analysis of the Zen’s high-level design.

Before we proceed any further we should take a quick step back. We first broke the news about AMD’s next generation high performance core back in September of last year. At which point AMD’s then CEO Rory Read revealed the code name for the company’s upcoming high performance x86 CPU microarchitecture. Prior to that revelation we only had knowledge of Zen’s sister ARMv8 core code named K12.


Back in May AMD announced that it was preparing an entirely new line-up of FX CPUs and a brand new platform ‘AM4″. We learned that the new family of FX processors code named “Summit Ridge” would feature an entirely new socket and an updated feature set including DDR4 memory support. And more importantly we learned that the new platform would feature mainstream CPUs with “high core counts” and “SMT” support.

Later a leak surfaced of a high performance server CPUs with up to 32 Zen CPU cores that AMD was planning to introduce with Zen. Reading all of those leaks about was interesting to say the least but it was also quite frustrating as we had no idea what to expect from Zen. That is until AMD revealed a whopper at its Financial Analyst Day earlier this year, which is that Zen will have a 40% instruction per clock improvement over its predecessor “Excavator”.

Читать еще:  Купить игру Need for Speed: Heat

AMD’s Zen CPU Core Coming in 2016 – Features FinFET Process, SMT And New Cache System

Zen will be AMD’s successor to the Bulldoze family of cores. It will be the first ever CPU core from the company to adopt simultaneous multithreading. It’s also the company’s first entirely new CPU core design following the Bulldozer family of cores which debuted in 2011 and was the company’s first ever design to feature clustered multithreading .

In addition to SMT, Zen also features a new high-bandwidth low latency cache system. A vital improvement over the previous generation of cores. Since subpar cache performance was one of the primary pitfalls of AMD’s Bulldozer CPU microarchitecture. The new CPU core is designed for and will be manufactured on an advanced FinFET process. Which would allow the CPU core to scale from low power mobile applications to high performance desktop and enterprise markets.

Zen To Feature A 40% Instructions Per Clock Improvement Over Excavator

Mark Papermaster, AMD’s Chief Technology Officer revealed that the company plans to introduce a huge IPC improvement with Zen over AMD’s latest generation “Excavator” x86 core. A 40% increase in IPC would represent the largest jump in IPC ever for the company, an improvement which Mark Papermaster claimed he had not seen “anywhere in the industry”.


Papermaster also made it a point to highlight that this 40% performance improvement figure is independent from the manufacturing process. So it’s a permanent architectural performance improvement that will always be present regardless of the process node.


Zen will be featured in AMD’s enthusiast CPU product line in 2016. Lisa Su confirmed that the new CPU architecture will be arriving to desktop FX CPUs first and to servers second. Succeeding Zen will be Zen+ cores. Which will feature evolutionary improvement over Zen. The company will introduce a new socket in 2016 dubbed AM4 that will house products spanning from high performance CPUs to mainstream APUs based on Zen and next generation FinFET GCN based GPUs.


The new family of high performance FX CPUs which appeared in previous leaks as “Summit Ridge” will feature SMT CPUs with high core counts and DDR4 memory support. The platform will be based on the new AM4 socket which will be shared with AMD’s upcoming Excavator based 7th generation APUs.

Zen’s Microarchitecture — The Unraveling Mystery

In the past couple of months alone we’ve seen a lot of new information come out about Zen. We reported on the AIDA64 changelog which icnluded Zen based “Summit Ridge” and “Raven Ridge” FX CPUs and APUs respectively. Prior to that we had very intriguing revelations about AMD’s Zen and K12 CPU cores taping out. We’ve also managed to learn a lot of about Zen through an official AMD Linux patch that detailed many aspects of the core’s design. If you want to read about everything that we learned with regards to the microarchitecture of the Zen CPU core and what it’s capable of you’ll definitely want to check out our in-depth analysis of the Zen’s high-level design.

Before we proceed any further we should take a quick step back. We first broke the news about AMD’s next generation high performance core back in September of last year. At which point AMD’s then CEO Rory Read revealed the code name for the company’s upcoming high performance x86 CPU microarchitecture. Prior to that revelation we only had knowledge of Zen’s sister ARMv8 core code named K12.


Back in May AMD announced that it was preparing an entirely new line-up of FX CPUs and a brand new platform ‘AM4″. We learned that the new family of FX processors code named “Summit Ridge” would feature an entirely new socket and an updated feature set including DDR4 memory support. And more importantly we learned that the new platform would feature mainstream CPUs with “high core counts” and “SMT” support.

Later a leak surfaced of a high performance server CPUs with up to 32 Zen CPU cores that AMD was planning to introduce with Zen. Reading all of those leaks about was interesting to say the least but it was also quite frustrating as we had no idea what to expect from Zen. That is until AMD revealed a whopper at its Financial Analyst Day earlier this year, which is that Zen will have a 40% instruction per clock improvement over its predecessor “Excavator”.

AMD’s Zen CPU Core Coming in 2016 – Features FinFET Process, SMT And New Cache System

Zen will be AMD’s successor to the Bulldoze family of cores. It will be the first ever CPU core from the company to adopt simultaneous multithreading. It’s also the company’s first entirely new CPU core design following the Bulldozer family of cores which debuted in 2011 and was the company’s first ever design to feature clustered multithreading .

In addition to SMT, Zen also features a new high-bandwidth low latency cache system. A vital improvement over the previous generation of cores. Since subpar cache performance was one of the primary pitfalls of AMD’s Bulldozer CPU microarchitecture. The new CPU core is designed for and will be manufactured on an advanced FinFET process. Which would allow the CPU core to scale from low power mobile applications to high performance desktop and enterprise markets.

Zen To Feature A 40% Instructions Per Clock Improvement Over Excavator

Mark Papermaster, AMD’s Chief Technology Officer revealed that the company plans to introduce a huge IPC improvement with Zen over AMD’s latest generation “Excavator” x86 core. A 40% increase in IPC would represent the largest jump in IPC ever for the company, an improvement which Mark Papermaster claimed he had not seen “anywhere in the industry”.


Papermaster also made it a point to highlight that this 40% performance improvement figure is independent from the manufacturing process. So it’s a permanent architectural performance improvement that will always be present regardless of the process node.


Zen will be featured in AMD’s enthusiast CPU product line in 2016. Lisa Su confirmed that the new CPU architecture will be arriving to desktop FX CPUs first and to servers second. Succeeding Zen will be Zen+ cores. Which will feature evolutionary improvement over Zen. The company will introduce a new socket in 2016 dubbed AM4 that will house products spanning from high performance CPUs to mainstream APUs based on Zen and next generation FinFET GCN based GPUs.


The new family of high performance FX CPUs which appeared in previous leaks as “Summit Ridge” will feature SMT CPUs with high core counts and DDR4 memory support. The platform will be based on the new AM4 socket which will be shared with AMD’s upcoming Excavator based 7th generation APUs.

LethalAffliction 182

LethalAffliction

  • Novice
  • Hunter
  • 182
  • 99 сообщений
    • Share

So, my craptop crapped out on me. Went to BestBuy and bought a $349 desktop that has a 2.2GHz Quad Core with integrated R7 radeon graphics gets 80 FPS in liset but in-game it drops to 8 FPS especially in Law of Retribution Raids so it didn’t have a good dollar to performance ratio. So I decided to return it and build one but it MUST have a pretty hard limit to $500 so here’s what I’ve come up with:

CPU: AMD Athlon X4 880K 4.0GHz Quad-Core ($83.98)
*MoBo: ASRock FM2A88X PRO3+ ATX FM2+ ($64.99)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 ($36.99)
Storage: SanDisk SSD PLUS 2.5″ 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive ($43.99)
**GPU Option 1: Red Dragon Radeon Rx 460 DirectX 12 with 4GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($129.99)
**GPU Option 2: Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti with 2GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($139.99)
Case: Rosewill Challenger ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99)
PSU: EVGA 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($43.49)
TOTAL: With taxes, roughly $500

Читать еще:  История падения Need For Speed

*If possible I would go ASRock Fatal1ty Gaming FM2A88X+ Killer.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a 430W power supply, sacrifice for a cheaper case with no fans included, and sacrifice for a cheap HDD but I don’t think it’s worth it.

**If possible I would go Radeon Rx 470 with 4GB 256-Bit GDDR5. or . Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 with 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a micro ATX motherboard, sacrifice for a 430W power supply, and sacrifice for a cheap micro ATX case but it may or may not be worth it.

Can someone help me? Will this run Warframe decently? I’m not looking to run with max settings on 1080p but I would like to get 30-40 FPS in-game even if it means running with lowest bare-bone graphics so that I can have an enjoyable experience. Ever since U18.5 hit I can’t seem to get out of 8-15 FPS averages while in-game and I’m hoping $500 can get me to run minimum settings efficiently. I honestly can’t fathom spending more money than that on a PC gaming rig.

Any help or constructive criticism is appreciated.

EDIT: This is my first attempt, and I knew nothing about this stuff 2 days ago. It was a huge learning curve so even compatibility feedback is appreciated. It’s also important that I know nothing about overclocking and what not. Friend was going to help me out with that if I got the better motherboard.

Zen’s Microarchitecture — The Unraveling Mystery

In the past couple of months alone we’ve seen a lot of new information come out about Zen. We reported on the AIDA64 changelog which icnluded Zen based “Summit Ridge” and “Raven Ridge” FX CPUs and APUs respectively. Prior to that we had very intriguing revelations about AMD’s Zen and K12 CPU cores taping out. We’ve also managed to learn a lot of about Zen through an official AMD Linux patch that detailed many aspects of the core’s design. If you want to read about everything that we learned with regards to the microarchitecture of the Zen CPU core and what it’s capable of you’ll definitely want to check out our in-depth analysis of the Zen’s high-level design.

Before we proceed any further we should take a quick step back. We first broke the news about AMD’s next generation high performance core back in September of last year. At which point AMD’s then CEO Rory Read revealed the code name for the company’s upcoming high performance x86 CPU microarchitecture. Prior to that revelation we only had knowledge of Zen’s sister ARMv8 core code named K12.


Back in May AMD announced that it was preparing an entirely new line-up of FX CPUs and a brand new platform ‘AM4″. We learned that the new family of FX processors code named “Summit Ridge” would feature an entirely new socket and an updated feature set including DDR4 memory support. And more importantly we learned that the new platform would feature mainstream CPUs with “high core counts” and “SMT” support.

Later a leak surfaced of a high performance server CPUs with up to 32 Zen CPU cores that AMD was planning to introduce with Zen. Reading all of those leaks about was interesting to say the least but it was also quite frustrating as we had no idea what to expect from Zen. That is until AMD revealed a whopper at its Financial Analyst Day earlier this year, which is that Zen will have a 40% instruction per clock improvement over its predecessor “Excavator”.

AMD’s Zen CPU Core Coming in 2016 – Features FinFET Process, SMT And New Cache System

Zen will be AMD’s successor to the Bulldoze family of cores. It will be the first ever CPU core from the company to adopt simultaneous multithreading. It’s also the company’s first entirely new CPU core design following the Bulldozer family of cores which debuted in 2011 and was the company’s first ever design to feature clustered multithreading .

In addition to SMT, Zen also features a new high-bandwidth low latency cache system. A vital improvement over the previous generation of cores. Since subpar cache performance was one of the primary pitfalls of AMD’s Bulldozer CPU microarchitecture. The new CPU core is designed for and will be manufactured on an advanced FinFET process. Which would allow the CPU core to scale from low power mobile applications to high performance desktop and enterprise markets.

Zen To Feature A 40% Instructions Per Clock Improvement Over Excavator

Mark Papermaster, AMD’s Chief Technology Officer revealed that the company plans to introduce a huge IPC improvement with Zen over AMD’s latest generation “Excavator” x86 core. A 40% increase in IPC would represent the largest jump in IPC ever for the company, an improvement which Mark Papermaster claimed he had not seen “anywhere in the industry”.


Papermaster also made it a point to highlight that this 40% performance improvement figure is independent from the manufacturing process. So it’s a permanent architectural performance improvement that will always be present regardless of the process node.


Zen will be featured in AMD’s enthusiast CPU product line in 2016. Lisa Su confirmed that the new CPU architecture will be arriving to desktop FX CPUs first and to servers second. Succeeding Zen will be Zen+ cores. Which will feature evolutionary improvement over Zen. The company will introduce a new socket in 2016 dubbed AM4 that will house products spanning from high performance CPUs to mainstream APUs based on Zen and next generation FinFET GCN based GPUs.


The new family of high performance FX CPUs which appeared in previous leaks as “Summit Ridge” will feature SMT CPUs with high core counts and DDR4 memory support. The platform will be based on the new AM4 socket which will be shared with AMD’s upcoming Excavator based 7th generation APUs.

LethalAffliction 182

LethalAffliction

  • Novice
  • Hunter
  • 182
  • 99 сообщений
    • Share

So, my craptop crapped out on me. Went to BestBuy and bought a $349 desktop that has a 2.2GHz Quad Core with integrated R7 radeon graphics gets 80 FPS in liset but in-game it drops to 8 FPS especially in Law of Retribution Raids so it didn’t have a good dollar to performance ratio. So I decided to return it and build one but it MUST have a pretty hard limit to $500 so here’s what I’ve come up with:

CPU: AMD Athlon X4 880K 4.0GHz Quad-Core ($83.98)
*MoBo: ASRock FM2A88X PRO3+ ATX FM2+ ($64.99)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 ($36.99)
Storage: SanDisk SSD PLUS 2.5″ 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive ($43.99)
**GPU Option 1: Red Dragon Radeon Rx 460 DirectX 12 with 4GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($129.99)
**GPU Option 2: Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti with 2GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($139.99)
Case: Rosewill Challenger ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99)
PSU: EVGA 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($43.49)
TOTAL: With taxes, roughly $500

*If possible I would go ASRock Fatal1ty Gaming FM2A88X+ Killer.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a 430W power supply, sacrifice for a cheaper case with no fans included, and sacrifice for a cheap HDD but I don’t think it’s worth it.

**If possible I would go Radeon Rx 470 with 4GB 256-Bit GDDR5. or . Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 with 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a micro ATX motherboard, sacrifice for a 430W power supply, and sacrifice for a cheap micro ATX case but it may or may not be worth it.

Читать еще:  Need For Speed: Most Wanted

Can someone help me? Will this run Warframe decently? I’m not looking to run with max settings on 1080p but I would like to get 30-40 FPS in-game even if it means running with lowest bare-bone graphics so that I can have an enjoyable experience. Ever since U18.5 hit I can’t seem to get out of 8-15 FPS averages while in-game and I’m hoping $500 can get me to run minimum settings efficiently. I honestly can’t fathom spending more money than that on a PC gaming rig.

Any help or constructive criticism is appreciated.

EDIT: This is my first attempt, and I knew nothing about this stuff 2 days ago. It was a huge learning curve so even compatibility feedback is appreciated. It’s also important that I know nothing about overclocking and what not. Friend was going to help me out with that if I got the better motherboard.

Zen’s Microarchitecture — The Unraveling Mystery

In the past couple of months alone we’ve seen a lot of new information come out about Zen. We reported on the AIDA64 changelog which icnluded Zen based “Summit Ridge” and “Raven Ridge” FX CPUs and APUs respectively. Prior to that we had very intriguing revelations about AMD’s Zen and K12 CPU cores taping out. We’ve also managed to learn a lot of about Zen through an official AMD Linux patch that detailed many aspects of the core’s design. If you want to read about everything that we learned with regards to the microarchitecture of the Zen CPU core and what it’s capable of you’ll definitely want to check out our in-depth analysis of the Zen’s high-level design.

Before we proceed any further we should take a quick step back. We first broke the news about AMD’s next generation high performance core back in September of last year. At which point AMD’s then CEO Rory Read revealed the code name for the company’s upcoming high performance x86 CPU microarchitecture. Prior to that revelation we only had knowledge of Zen’s sister ARMv8 core code named K12.


Back in May AMD announced that it was preparing an entirely new line-up of FX CPUs and a brand new platform ‘AM4″. We learned that the new family of FX processors code named “Summit Ridge” would feature an entirely new socket and an updated feature set including DDR4 memory support. And more importantly we learned that the new platform would feature mainstream CPUs with “high core counts” and “SMT” support.

Later a leak surfaced of a high performance server CPUs with up to 32 Zen CPU cores that AMD was planning to introduce with Zen. Reading all of those leaks about was interesting to say the least but it was also quite frustrating as we had no idea what to expect from Zen. That is until AMD revealed a whopper at its Financial Analyst Day earlier this year, which is that Zen will have a 40% instruction per clock improvement over its predecessor “Excavator”.

AMD’s Zen CPU Core Coming in 2016 – Features FinFET Process, SMT And New Cache System

Zen will be AMD’s successor to the Bulldoze family of cores. It will be the first ever CPU core from the company to adopt simultaneous multithreading. It’s also the company’s first entirely new CPU core design following the Bulldozer family of cores which debuted in 2011 and was the company’s first ever design to feature clustered multithreading .

In addition to SMT, Zen also features a new high-bandwidth low latency cache system. A vital improvement over the previous generation of cores. Since subpar cache performance was one of the primary pitfalls of AMD’s Bulldozer CPU microarchitecture. The new CPU core is designed for and will be manufactured on an advanced FinFET process. Which would allow the CPU core to scale from low power mobile applications to high performance desktop and enterprise markets.

Zen To Feature A 40% Instructions Per Clock Improvement Over Excavator

Mark Papermaster, AMD’s Chief Technology Officer revealed that the company plans to introduce a huge IPC improvement with Zen over AMD’s latest generation “Excavator” x86 core. A 40% increase in IPC would represent the largest jump in IPC ever for the company, an improvement which Mark Papermaster claimed he had not seen “anywhere in the industry”.


Papermaster also made it a point to highlight that this 40% performance improvement figure is independent from the manufacturing process. So it’s a permanent architectural performance improvement that will always be present regardless of the process node.


Zen will be featured in AMD’s enthusiast CPU product line in 2016. Lisa Su confirmed that the new CPU architecture will be arriving to desktop FX CPUs first and to servers second. Succeeding Zen will be Zen+ cores. Which will feature evolutionary improvement over Zen. The company will introduce a new socket in 2016 dubbed AM4 that will house products spanning from high performance CPUs to mainstream APUs based on Zen and next generation FinFET GCN based GPUs.


The new family of high performance FX CPUs which appeared in previous leaks as “Summit Ridge” will feature SMT CPUs with high core counts and DDR4 memory support. The platform will be based on the new AM4 socket which will be shared with AMD’s upcoming Excavator based 7th generation APUs.

LethalAffliction 182

LethalAffliction

  • Novice
  • Hunter
  • 182
  • 99 сообщений
    • Share

So, my craptop crapped out on me. Went to BestBuy and bought a $349 desktop that has a 2.2GHz Quad Core with integrated R7 radeon graphics gets 80 FPS in liset but in-game it drops to 8 FPS especially in Law of Retribution Raids so it didn’t have a good dollar to performance ratio. So I decided to return it and build one but it MUST have a pretty hard limit to $500 so here’s what I’ve come up with:

CPU: AMD Athlon X4 880K 4.0GHz Quad-Core ($83.98)
*MoBo: ASRock FM2A88X PRO3+ ATX FM2+ ($64.99)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 ($36.99)
Storage: SanDisk SSD PLUS 2.5″ 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive ($43.99)
**GPU Option 1: Red Dragon Radeon Rx 460 DirectX 12 with 4GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($129.99)
**GPU Option 2: Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti with 2GB 128-Bit GDDR5 ($139.99)
Case: Rosewill Challenger ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99)
PSU: EVGA 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($43.49)
TOTAL: With taxes, roughly $500

*If possible I would go ASRock Fatal1ty Gaming FM2A88X+ Killer.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a 430W power supply, sacrifice for a cheaper case with no fans included, and sacrifice for a cheap HDD but I don’t think it’s worth it.

**If possible I would go Radeon Rx 470 with 4GB 256-Bit GDDR5. or . Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 with 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5.
In order to do this I would need to sacrifice for a micro ATX motherboard, sacrifice for a 430W power supply, and sacrifice for a cheap micro ATX case but it may or may not be worth it.

Can someone help me? Will this run Warframe decently? I’m not looking to run with max settings on 1080p but I would like to get 30-40 FPS in-game even if it means running with lowest bare-bone graphics so that I can have an enjoyable experience. Ever since U18.5 hit I can’t seem to get out of 8-15 FPS averages while in-game and I’m hoping $500 can get me to run minimum settings efficiently. I honestly can’t fathom spending more money than that on a PC gaming rig.

Any help or constructive criticism is appreciated.

EDIT: This is my first attempt, and I knew nothing about this stuff 2 days ago. It was a huge learning curve so even compatibility feedback is appreciated. It’s also important that I know nothing about overclocking and what not. Friend was going to help me out with that if I got the better motherboard.

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